This is the Hard Part

So this is where it gets hard being the boss. For the most part, I have a productive, highly respected, engaged and contented staff. Even though there are a few rough interpersonal communication spots among some of the team on occasion, engagement scores are high and productivity is meeting or beating every KPI metric. Yet there’s that one bad apple who screws up the curve.  

Despite nearly two years of coaching and counseling, even rewarding good behaviors despite the risk of reinforcing the bad, this one person refuses to meet the very basic expectations for their role. They are clear, measurable, achievable, and reasonable expectations for their experience level and role, basic competencies that every person in this role is expected to master. Yet this person defiantly has refused to do the basic things required. Even their local HR is exhausted with this person’s insubordination.  

But I’m not allowed to terminate their employment.  

This is the hard part. Acquiescing to the directive from higher up, being the good team player, subrogating my managerial prerogative for “the greater good of the organization”. Dealing with the continuing problem and swallowing any indignation about it is part and parcel of being the executive leader of this team. Or so I’m lead to believe. And I can deal with it for now. But it’s still hard.   

I’m concerned about the effect that this person continuing with the team will have on other members of the organization. By this person appearing to get away with repeated failure to meet expectations, I’m afraid the rest of the team will be demotivated. Also, I’d be lying if I didn’t acknowledge that being rendered powerless in this respect is demotivating for me. And, not for nothing, this person won’t learn or grow if there is no practical consequences for their failure.   

What’s hard, also, is that I was made to hire this person against my wishes for similar “greater good” reasons. So I feel like this is a double punch to the gut: to be proven right about a bad decision and then prevented from getting rid of the problem. Yet, because I’m a good corporate soldier and an excellent team player, I’ll endure. For now. 

But I make no promises that I won’t be insufferably, jubilantly smug and say “I told you so” a bunch of times when I do finally get to fire this festering blister of recalcitrant disrespect. I can wait for that, I guess. 

Advertisements

No comments yet

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: